Rabies Symptoms in Dogs – What to Know


Updated: June 3, 2023

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Rabies is a viral disease that affects the central nervous system of dogs. The symptoms of rabies can vary but typically progress in distinct stages. The initial symptoms include subtle changes in behavior, such as restlessness, irritability, and unexplained aggression. Dogs may also experience fever, weakness, and loss of appetite.

As the disease progresses, more specific symptoms become apparent. Dogs may exhibit excessive salivation and drooling due to the virus’s impact on the salivary glands. They may also have difficulty swallowing, leading to choking episodes and foaming at the mouth. Changes in vocalization, including unexplained silence or excessive barking, may occur.

Neurological symptoms become more pronounced in the later stages of rabies. Dogs may display disorientation, confusion, and aimless wandering. They may have difficulty coordinating their movements, resulting in a lack of balance and unsteady gait. Muscle weakness, tremors, and seizures may also be present.

In the final stages of rabies, paralysis and coma can occur. Dogs may become unresponsive and experience respiratory distress. Unfortunately, once clinical signs appear, rabies is almost always fatal, emphasizing the importance of early intervention and prevention through vaccination.

It is essential to note that rabies symptoms in dogs can be similar to other illnesses, making it crucial to consult a veterinarian for a proper diagnosis. Additionally, any suspicion of rabies should be taken seriously due to the risks posed to both animal and human health. Taking preventive measures, such as vaccinating dogs against rabies and avoiding contact with potentially infected animals, is key to controlling the spread of this deadly disease.

Recognizing the symptoms of rabies in dogs, which can range from changes in behavior to neurological abnormalities, is crucial for timely intervention and public safety. By remaining vigilant and seeking veterinary care when necessary, we can help protect our canine companions and prevent the transmission of rabies to humans and other animals.

1 Understanding Rabies: Causes, Transmission, and Impact

Rabies, a viral disease caused by the rabies virus of the Rhabdoviridae family, specifically targets the central nervous system (CNS) in mammals, including dogs. It is a highly fatal disease once symptoms become apparent. Gaining a comprehensive understanding of the causes, transmission, and impact of rabies is crucial in effectively combating this deadly disease. Rabies is primarily transmitted through the bite or scratch of an infected animal, with wild animals like raccoons, bats, and foxes being common carriers.

The virus travels from the site of infection to the CNS, leading to severe neurological symptoms and ultimately death. Rabies has a significant impact on public health, animal welfare, and the community as a whole. Implementing preventive measures, such as vaccination programs and responsible pet ownership, is crucial for controlling the spread of rabies and protecting both humans and animals from its devastating consequences.

1.1 Causes of Rabies

Rabies is caused by the rabies virus, which is mainly transmitted through the saliva of an infected animal. The most common source of transmission to dogs is through the bite of an infected animal, such as a wild animal or another rabid dog. The virus enters the body and travels along the peripheral nerves to the central nervous system, including the brain.

1.2 Transmission of Rabies

The rabies virus is primarily transmitted through the bite of an infected animal. However, transmission can also occur if infected saliva comes into contact with open wounds, mucous membranes, or broken skin. Other less common modes of transmission include scratches, licks on broken skin, or contact with mucous membranes. It’s important to note that the virus cannot penetrate intact skin.

1.3 Impact of Rabies

Rabies has a severe impact on both animal and human health. Once the virus enters the CNS, it rapidly replicates and spreads, leading to inflammation and damage to the brain and spinal cord. Infected dogs typically exhibit behavioral changes, neurological symptoms, and ultimately, death. Rabies is not only a significant threat to the affected animal but also poses a serious risk to humans through bites or scratches.

2 Recognizing Early Symptoms of Rabies in Dogs

Recognizing the early symptoms of rabies in dogs is vital for prompt intervention and curbing the spread of the disease. The incubation period of rabies can vary, lasting anywhere from a few weeks to several months. Being aware of the early signs empowers dog owners to seek veterinary care promptly. Here are common early symptoms to watch for:

Fever, weakness, and lethargy may indicate the presence of rabies. Unexplained high body temperature, along with unusual tiredness or sluggishness, should be cause for concern. Changes in appetite and behavior are notable signs. Dogs may experience loss of appetite, difficulty eating, and exhibit unusual behavioral shifts like aggression, irritability, or withdrawal. Excessive drooling and difficulty swallowing are characteristic of rabies. Dogs may have trouble swallowing due to paralyzed throat muscles, resulting in excessive salivation and challenges with eating and drinking.

2.1 Fever, Weakness, and Lethargy

One of the early indicators of rabies in dogs is the presence of fever. If your dog suddenly develops an unexplained high body temperature, it may be a cause for concern. In addition to fever, infected dogs may exhibit weakness and lethargy, appearing unusually tired or sluggish.

2.2 Changes in Appetite and Behavior

Rabies can cause significant changes in a dog’s appetite and behavior. Dogs may experience a loss of appetite or have difficulty eating due to pain and discomfort. They may also exhibit unusual behavioral changes, such as aggression, irritability, or withdrawal. Pay attention to any sudden shifts in your dog’s eating habits or behavior.

2.3 Excessive Drooling and Difficulty Swallowing

Rabies affects the salivary glands, leading to excessive drooling or foaming at the mouth. Infected dogs may have difficulty swallowing due to paralysis of the throat muscles. This can result in excessive salivation, making it challenging for the dog to eat, drink, or swallow normally.

2.4 Changes in Vocalization

Vocalization changes can be an early warning sign of rabies in dogs. Infected dogs may experience alterations in their usual vocal patterns. They may become unusually quiet, hesitant to bark, or produce abnormal sounds. Alternatively, they may exhibit excessive vocalization, barking, or growling without apparent cause.

2.5 Agitation and Restlessness

Rabies can cause dogs to become restless and agitated. They may exhibit pacing behavior, unable to settle or relax. This restlessness is often accompanied by other signs of nervous system involvement, such as muscle tremors or twitching.

3 Behavioral Changes: A Key Indicator of Rabies

Behavioral changes in dogs can be significant indicators of a potential rabies infection. Rabies directly affects the central nervous system, resulting in notable alterations in a dog’s behavior. Being able to recognize these changes is essential for identifying possible cases of rabies and taking the necessary actions. One of the key behavioral changes associated with rabies is unexplained aggression and irritability. Infected dogs may display aggressive behavior, such as growling, snarling, and biting, even without provocation. Restlessness and hyperactivity are also common, as infected dogs struggle to stay still or settle down.

Conversely, some dogs with rabies may exhibit unusual friendliness or withdrawal. They may seek attention from unfamiliar individuals or become unusually shy or reclusive. Disorientation and confusion are additional signs, with infected dogs displaying aimless wandering and difficulty recognizing familiar surroundings or people. Here are some behavioral changes commonly associated with rabies in dogs:

3.1 Unexplained Aggression and Irritability

One of the hallmark behavioral changes in dogs with rabies is unexplained aggression and irritability. Infected dogs may display aggressive behavior, such as growling, snarling, and biting, even without provocation. They may become highly reactive and exhibit hostility towards people, animals, or inanimate objects. This sudden change in temperament is often uncharacteristic of the dog’s usual behavior.

3.2 Restlessness and Hyperactivity

Rabies can cause dogs to become restless and hyperactive. They may exhibit excessive pacing, unable to stay still or settle down. This restlessness is often accompanied by heightened alertness and an overall sense of unease. The dog may appear agitated and constantly on edge.

3.3 Unusual Friendliness or Withdrawal

While aggression is a common behavioral change, some dogs with rabies may exhibit the opposite behavior. Infected dogs may become unusually friendly and seek attention from unfamiliar individuals, showing no regard for social boundaries. On the other hand, some dogs may withdraw and become uncharacteristically shy or reclusive.

3.4 Disorientation and Confusion

Rabies affects the neurological functioning of dogs, leading to disorientation and confusion. Infected dogs may exhibit signs of confusion, such as aimless wandering, difficulty recognizing familiar surroundings or people, and getting lost even in familiar territories. Disorientation can contribute to increased anxiety and fearfulness.

4 Neurological Symptoms: Assessing the Nervous System

Rabies is a viral disease that primarily targets the central nervous system (CNS) of dogs. As the infection advances, a variety of neurological symptoms may arise, aiding in the identification of potential rabies cases. It is essential to recognize these neurological symptoms promptly to enable timely intervention and appropriate management.

Neurological signs associated with rabies include seizures and muscle tremors, which can range from mild to severe and occur sporadically or in a repetitive pattern. Dogs infected with rabies may also experience paralysis and a loss of coordination, resulting in weakness, difficulty standing or walking, and an unsteady gait. Pica, the consumption of non-food items, can be observed as a result of the disease’s impact on the nervous system. Changes in vocalization, such as difficulty barking or producing abnormal sounds, may also occur. Here are some common neurological symptoms associated with rabies in dogs:

4.1 Seizures and Muscle Tremors

One of the prominent neurological signs of rabies is the occurrence of seizures and muscle tremors. Infected dogs may experience uncontrolled muscle contractions, resulting in involuntary shaking or trembling. Seizures can range from mild to severe, and they may occur sporadically or in a repetitive pattern.

4.2 Paralysis and Loss of Coordination

Rabies can cause paralysis and a loss of coordination in dogs. As the virus affects the CNS, dogs may exhibit weakness in their limbs, have difficulty standing or walking, and display an unsteady gait. Paralysis can progress rapidly, eventually affecting multiple muscle groups and leading to complete immobilization.

4.3 Pica: Consuming Non-Food Items

An unusual behavior associated with rabies in dogs is pica, which involves the consumption of non-food items. Infected dogs may develop a compulsion to eat or chew on objects that are not edible, such as rocks, dirt, or even their own feces. Pica is a result of the neurological disturbances caused by the rabies virus.

4.4 Changes in Vocalization

Rabies can also affect a dog’s vocalization patterns. Infected dogs may experience changes in their ability to bark or produce normal vocal sounds. They may exhibit difficulty vocalizing or produce abnormal sounds, such as a hoarse or muted voice. In some cases, dogs may vocalize excessively, seemingly without reason or provocation.

It is important to note that neurological symptoms alone may not be specific to rabies and can be seen in other neurological disorders or conditions. However, when combined with other clinical signs and a potential exposure to rabies, the presence of these neurological symptoms becomes highly concerning.

5 Digestive and Respiratory Symptoms: An Overview

Identifying the digestive and respiratory symptoms associated with rabies in dogs is paramount in detecting potential cases and obtaining prompt veterinary assistance. Rabies is a viral illness that primarily impacts the central nervous system but can also affect the digestive and respiratory systems. Familiarizing oneself with these symptoms is essential for early intervention. Here are the key points to recognize:

Rabies can cause gastrointestinal disturbances, leading to symptoms like vomiting and diarrhea in infected dogs. Respiratory symptoms can occur due to the virus’s impact on the respiratory muscles, resulting in difficulty breathing and excessive panting. Swallowing difficulties may arise as the disease progresses, leading to choking episodes and frothing or foaming saliva. Additionally, infected dogs may experience a loss of bladder and bowel control.

If any of these symptoms are observed, particularly alongside other signs of rabies or a potential exposure to the virus, immediate veterinary attention is crucial. Timely diagnosis and intervention are vital for the well-being of the infected dog and the prevention of transmission to other animals and humans. Here is an overview of the common digestive and respiratory symptoms associated with rabies in dogs:

5.1 Vomiting and Diarrhea

Rabies can cause gastrointestinal disturbances in infected dogs, leading to symptoms such as vomiting and diarrhea. Dogs may experience frequent episodes of vomiting, which can be accompanied by the regurgitation of frothy saliva. Diarrhea may also occur, resulting in loose or watery stools.

5.2 Difficulty Breathing and Excessive Panting

Respiratory symptoms can occur as the rabies virus affects the muscles involved in breathing. Infected dogs may exhibit difficulty breathing, characterized by rapid or labored breathing. They may also pant excessively, even in the absence of physical exertion or elevated temperatures. These respiratory changes can be a result of both the viral effects on the respiratory system and the associated neurological impairment.

5.3 Swallowing Difficulties and Choking

As rabies progresses, dogs may experience difficulty swallowing due to paralysis of the throat muscles. This can lead to choking episodes or the dog’s inability to swallow food and water normally. The combination of swallowing difficulties and excessive drooling can result in a visible frothing or foaming of saliva around the mouth.

5.4 Loss of Bladder and Bowel Control

Neurological involvement in rabies can lead to a loss of bladder and bowel control in infected dogs. As the disease progresses, dogs may be unable to control their urination and defecation, resulting in involuntary accidents indoors or an inability to relieve themselves appropriately.

It’s important to note that these digestive and respiratory symptoms can also be associated with other health conditions. However, if you observe any combination of these symptoms in your dog, especially in conjunction with other clinical signs of rabies or a potential exposure to the virus, it is crucial to seek immediate veterinary care.

Prompt intervention is essential not only for the well-being of the infected dog but also to mitigate the risk of transmission to other animals and humans. Rabies is a serious and fatal disease, and early diagnosis and intervention are vital for the safety of both animals and public health.

6 How Rabies Affects a Dog’s Salivary Glands and Jaw Muscles

Recognizing the specific impact of rabies on a dog’s salivary glands and jaw muscles is essential for identifying potential cases of the disease and responding accordingly. Rabies is a viral infection that primarily targets the central nervous system but can also have distinct effects on the salivary glands and jaw muscles of infected dogs. Understanding these effects is crucial for early detection and appropriate action. Here are the key points to consider:

Rabies can lead to excessive salivation and drooling in dogs due to the virus’s impact on the salivary glands. Difficulty swallowing, known as dysphagia, may occur as the disease progresses, resulting from paralysis of the throat muscles. Changes in jaw muscles can cause stiffness or spasms, leading to a locked or dropped jaw, also known as trismus or “lockjaw.”

These specific effects on the salivary glands and jaw muscles are important indicators of potential rabies infection. If any of these signs are observed, especially in conjunction with other symptoms of rabies or a possible exposure to the virus, immediate veterinary care should be sought. Prompt diagnosis and appropriate measures are crucial for the well-being of the infected dog and for public health safety. Here’s an overview of how rabies specifically impacts a dog’s salivary glands and jaw muscles:

6.1 Increased Salivation and Drooling

One of the characteristic signs of rabies in dogs is excessive salivation and drooling. The rabies virus affects the salivary glands, leading to the overproduction of saliva. Infected dogs may drool excessively, and their saliva may appear thick or foamy. This increased salivation is often accompanied by difficulty swallowing due to paralysis of the throat muscles.

6.2 Difficulty Swallowing and Choking

As the rabies virus progresses, dogs may experience difficulty swallowing, known as dysphagia. This occurs due to the paralysis of the muscles involved in swallowing. Infected dogs may struggle to eat, drink, or swallow normally, leading to frequent choking episodes. This symptom, along with excessive drooling, is often a significant concern for dog owners.

6.3 Changes in Jaw Muscles

Rabies can also affect the jaw muscles, leading to changes in a dog’s ability to open or close its mouth properly. Infected dogs may exhibit jaw muscle stiffness or spasms, resulting in a locked or dropped jaw. This condition, known as trismus or “lockjaw,” can contribute to difficulties in eating, drinking, and vocalizing.

6.4 Aggressive Behavior and Biting

Due to the impact of rabies on the central nervous system, infected dogs may display aggressive behavior and exhibit unprovoked biting. The combination of increased salivation, difficulty swallowing, and changes in jaw muscles can contribute to aggressive tendencies. It is important to note that aggression and biting can occur throughout the course of the disease, even in the early stages.

Recognizing these specific effects of rabies on a dog’s salivary glands and jaw muscles is essential for identifying potential cases. If you observe any combination of excessive salivation, difficulty swallowing, choking episodes, changes in jaw movement, or unexplained aggressive behavior, especially in the context of a potential exposure to rabies, it is crucial to seek immediate veterinary care.

FAQs

How is rabies transmitted to dogs?

Rabies is typically transmitted to dogs through the bite or scratch of an infected animal, most commonly wildlife such as bats, raccoons, skunks, and foxes. The virus is present in the saliva of infected animals and can enter the bloodstream through open wounds or mucous membranes.

Can dogs get rabies from other dogs?

While rare, it is possible for dogs to contract rabies from other infected dogs through bite wounds or close contact with saliva or nervous tissue. However, dog-to-dog transmission is not as common as transmission from wildlife.

What should I do if my dog is bitten by a potentially rabid animal?

If your dog is bitten by a potentially rabid animal, it is important to take immediate action. First, ensure the safety of yourself and others by safely restraining your dog and avoiding direct contact with the wound. Next, contact your veterinarian for guidance. They will assess the situation, provide necessary treatment, and may recommend reporting the incident to the local animal control or public health authorities.

Can dogs be vaccinated against rabies?

Yes, dogs can and should be vaccinated against rabies. Vaccination is the most effective preventive measure against the disease. Regular rabies vaccinations are typically required by law in many countries and are essential for the health and safety of dogs and the community.

Are there any early signs of rabies that I should watch out for in my dog?

Yes, there are several early signs of rabies in dogs to be aware of. These can include changes in behavior, such as aggression or withdrawal, fever, weakness, loss of appetite, excessive drooling, and difficulty swallowing. If you notice any of these symptoms, especially if there has been a potential exposure to rabies, it is crucial to seek veterinary care immediately.

Is rabies in dogs treatable?

Unfortunately, there is no cure for rabies in dogs once clinical signs appear. Rabies is almost always fatal. This is why prevention through vaccination and prompt intervention in suspected cases is so important.

Can humans get rabies from infected dogs?

Yes, rabies can be transmitted from infected dogs to humans through bites or scratches. It is important to exercise caution and seek medical attention immediately if you are bitten or scratched by a dog or any other potentially rabid animal.

Conclusion

Recognizing and understanding the symptoms of rabies in dogs play a vital role in ensuring timely intervention and protecting against this highly dangerous and potentially fatal disease. By familiarizing themselves with the various symptoms discussed in this guide, dog owners can proactively monitor their pets’ health and seek immediate veterinary care when necessary. This not only helps safeguard the well-being of their beloved companions but also contributes to the safety of the surrounding community.

It is important to remember that prevention is key when it comes to rabies. Vaccinating dogs against rabies is a critical step in preventing the disease. Regular vaccinations not only provide individual protection but also help create a barrier against the spread of rabies within the dog population. Additionally, raising awareness about rabies and its symptoms is crucial. Educating dog owners and the general public about the signs and risks of rabies can help promote early detection and timely intervention. Understanding the importance of responsible pet ownership, including keeping dogs properly vaccinated and avoiding contact with potentially infected animals, is essential in preventing the transmission of rabies.


Paula

Paula

Paula patton is an avid dog lover and pet enthusiast with a wealth of knowledge in pet food and treatment. With her vast experience, she has gained valuable insights into the world of pets and their needs. Through her writings, Paula shares her expertise, helping fellow pet owners make informed decisions for their furry companions. Her passion for animals shines through every word, making her a trusted source for all things related to pets.

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